Skip to main content Skip to home page

Witnessing documents

Documents may need to be witnessed by an authorised person before they can be accepted by a range of organisations.

For screen reader users on mobile, if you are using a keyboard: type in the input field, then switch to Quick nav and move below the input field to access results. A result has to be clicked twice in order to submit the search. If you are not using a keyboard: type in the input field, then tap at the top of the screen and navigate down to the results below the input field. A result has to be clicked twice in order to submit the search.

Documents are witnessed to confirm the accuracy of information and minimise the risk of people fraudulently submitting documents. 

Affidavits 

An is a written statement of fact, sworn by or .

See the Department of Justice and Community Safety's website for more information about affidavits. 

If you intentionally make a false statement in an affidavit, you can be charged with perjury. 

Registrars of the Magistrates' Court of Victoria are available during normal business hours to witness affidavits. See the relevant Magistrates’ Court contact us page for opening hours.   

 

A statutory declaration is a written statement signed and declared to be true before an authorised witness. Statutory declarations are not the same as affidavits, as they are not confirmed by oath or affirmation.

If you intentionally make a false statement in a statutory declaration, you can be charged with a criminal offence.

Certified documents

A certified copy is a photocopy of an original document that has been certified as being a true copy of the original by an authorised person.

Certified documents to be sent interstate or overseas should be signed by a justice of the peace or public notary. Registrars are not considered as a justice of the peace or public notary.  

To find a:

Justice of the peace

To find a:

Last updated on 28 Feb 2019
Back to top